Robinson Bradshaw

Month: December 2009

Personal Genomics: A Participatory Activity

Last week the GLR covered deCODEme’s announcement that it was offering existing customers of its main competitor, 23andMe, the opportunity to have their genomic data interpreted by deCODEme’s own service. For free. Although somewhat surprising from a short-term commercial perspective, I generally liked the move by deCODE as a means to improve the company’s genomic […]

Follow-on Biologics: How Much Incentive Do We Need?

After almost a full year of debate, a pathway for approving “follow-on biologics” or “biosimilars” continues to be a hot topic in Congress. We are all familiar with generic versions of brand-name drugs, and the federal regulatory scheme sets out well-defined shortcut procedures for approval of generics. Congress is now grappling with designing procedures for […]

Genetic Discrimination Comes in Many Colors

An email from a regular Genomics Law Report reader notes that we have been engaging unwittingly in genetic discrimination. Dr. Bob West is color-blind, and he points out that our treatment of hyperlinks—to date we have used red hyperlinks against black text in our posts, without any other markings to distinguish linked from ordinary text—creates […]

Weekly Twitter Roundup

Each week there are a number of stories and developments that, for one reason or another, don’t find their way into a full-length posting on the Genomics Law Report. Here’s a recap of what I was Tweeting this week @genomicslawyer: RT @dgmacarthur: RT @nanopore: Ace coverage of cancer genomes papers by @markgfh @timesscience http://bit.ly/6piUz9 Interesting […]

Is deCODEme Taking a Page from the 23andMe Playbook?

Daniel MacArthur of Genetic Future provides coverage of the decision by direct-to-consumer (DTC) genomics service provider deCODEme to offer existing 23andMe customers the ability to upload their raw 23andMe data to the deCODEme service. For free. MacArthur correctly notes that the value of the genome scans provided by companies such as 23andMe and deCODEme lies […]

Reproductive Genetic Screening: More Questions Than Answers

The Genomics Law Report has published a couple of guest commentaries recently dealing with genetic screening—a topic our own Adam Doerr also addressed in two posts this summer dealing with “wrongful life” claims brought against sperm banks by children with genetic diseases inherited from their donor fathers. Such claims are premised on the failure of […]

Protecting Your Brand Name on the Internet

Twenty-four hundred years ago, in the scroll age, the marketing guru Socrates observed, “Regard your good name as the richest jewel you can possibly be possessed of.” In the intervening years, only the technology of communication has changed; the wisdom of protecting your brand name and the goodwill it carries is still valid. For many […]

What ELSI was New? Plenty.

From October 5 to December 8, 2009, the Genomics Law Report featured a series of thirty-six guest commentaries by industry, academic and thought leaders in the fields of genomics and personalized medicine. Entitled What ELSI is New?, the series, which we have organized into an e-book (pdf), asked each contributor to briefly respond to the following question: “What do […]

Weekly Twitter Roundup

Each week there are a number of stories and developments that, for one reason or another, don’t find their way into a full-length posting on the Genomics Law Report. Here’s a recap of what I was Tweeting this week @genomicslawyer: British scientists demand libel law reform http://bit.ly/5OWUat (via @NatureNews) Claim: Journals avoiding manuscripts due to […]

Protecting the Name

A great invention deserves a great name. When the time comes to market your game-changer, you can be sure of two marketing realities: copiers will race to build similar products, and purchasers will reward the product they remember. These two truths lie behind the adoption of the trademark iPhone® to identify Apple Inc.’s unique combination […]