Robinson Bradshaw

Month: April 2010

Weekly Twitter Roundup

Each week there are a number of stories and developments that, for one reason or another, don’t find their way into a full-length posting on the Genomics Law Report. Below is a recap of what I was Tweeting this week @genomicslawyer. Also remember to check out the Tweet’s from this week’s GET Conference (Past, Present […]

GINA in Action: Woman alleges genetic test led to firing

In what appears to be the first publicly identified case of its kind, a Connecticut woman has accused her employer of violating the recently enacted federal Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA). According to a story in the Boston Herald (discovered thanks to a tip from Matt Mealiffe), 39-year-old Pamela Fink received an elective double mastectomy […]

Past, Present and Future of Genomes, Environments and Traits: 140 Characters at a Time

The first annual Genomes, Environments, Traits (GET) Conference took place yesterday. The GET Conference was an incredible success, with panels, breakout sessions and presentations from all manner of genomic pioneers and futurists, as well as a tremendous audience, both in person and online. In the next few days I’ll share a few thoughts about what […]

Weekly Twitter Roundup: Bio-IT World Edition

Each week there are a number of stories and developments that, for one reason or another, don’t find their way into a full-length posting on the Genomics Law Report. In addition, this past week I spoke at the 9th Annual Bio-IT World Conference, and provided live updates from several of the other sessions at the […]

The Havasupai Indians and the Challenge of Informed Consent for Genomic Research

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Amy Harmon, of The New York Times, reports that a long-running dispute between Arizona State University (ASU) and the Havasupai Indians over the allegedly improper research use of DNA from members of the tribe has been settled. The research began two decades ago, ostensibly to search for a genetic variant that might […]

The Unexpected Impact of Genetics on the Business World

Recent advances in genetic science are remarkable. In 2003 the first full human genome was sequenced after 13 years of work at a cost of over $3 billion. Today, the cost to sequence any individual’s entire genome is approaching $1,000. Genetic tests for specific genes linked to cancer and other diseases exist today and many […]

Welcome to Scientia Pro Publica #26

In honor of DNA Day, the Genomics Law Report is completing its transformation into a one stop shop for the best in blog wrangling by hosting Scientia Pro Publica #26 and Blawg Review #260 in the same week. We think it fitting that these two august reviews should appear side-by-side at the GLR, which itself sits […]

Welcome to Blawg Review #260

The Genomics Law Report is pleased to host the 260th Blawg Review. For regular GLR readers who are unfamiliar with the Blawg Review concept, it’s the longest-running weekly recap of legal blog posts in cyberspace. Each week, a different legal-related blog (also referred to as a blawg or, in the GLR’s case, an Internet journal) […]

Weekly Twitter Roundup

Each week there are a number of stories and developments that, for one reason or another, don’t find their way into a full-length posting on the Genomics Law Report. Here’s a recap of what I was Tweeting this week @genomicslawyer: RT @DukeIGSP: International Cancer Genome Consortium plans to sequence 25,000 cancer genomes. http://bit.ly/dazRAJ RT @dgmacarthur: […]

SACGHS Chair: Put Patients Before Patents

This afternoon, the journal Genetics in Medicine released an online-only supplement analyzing the relationship between gene patents and genetic testing. The bulk of the issue is devoted to a series of 8 case studies surrounding 10 clinical conditions. The case studies were undertaken over the past several years by researchers at Duke University’s Center for […]