Robinson Bradshaw

Month: November 2010

Restricting Gene Patents: A Pro-Market Agenda

This commentary is contributed by James P. Evans, clinical professor genetics and medicine at the University of North Carolina and Editor-in-Chief of Genetics in Medicine. Gene patents have been controversial since they were first granted in the US over two decades ago. The controversy is now reaching a fevered pitch after a surprising US District […]

A Thanksgiving Tradition: 23andMe Repackages Product, Raises Prices

Last November, just before Thanksgiving, 23andMe, the most popular provider of direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing products, announced a new product and pricing model. The company took its most popular product—a $399 all-in-one genotyping service—and split it into two separate products, an “Ancestry Edition” and a “Health Edition.” It also raised prices, with the complete package jumping […]

Germany Struggles to Find Balance in Promoting, Regulating Genetic Technologies

Last fall we reported on the passage of the Human Genetic Examination Act by the German Bundestag. We characterized the Gendiagnostikgesetz (GenDG), as the act is known in Germany, as “a clear example of what is known as ‘genetic exceptionalism’—the belief that genetic information is qualitatively different from other forms of personal or medical information—staking […]

Twitter Roundup: Personalized Medicine Conference Edition

With so many developments at the intersection of genomics and the law, there are often a variety of interesting stories that, for one reason or another, don’t find their way into a full-length posting on the Genomics Law Report. In addition to the regular @genomicslawyer Twitter recap, this week I was also tweeting from the […]

Digging Deeper into the EEOC’s Final GINA Regulations

As we wrote yesterday, last week the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued definitive rules and regulations (pdf) with respect to Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA). In our previous post we offered a brief overview of the new regulations, as well as some preliminary suggestions for employers just now coming […]

Update: EEOC Issues Final Genetic Nondiscrimination Rules

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has issued its final rules and regulations implementing the employment provisions of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA). Signed into law in 2008, GINA took effect in two stages in 2009, with Title I (which applies to health insurers and plans) effective in May and Title II […]

Next-Gen Sequencing Update: Sequencing for Thousands, Suing for Millions

It is shaping up to be an eventful fourth quarter for genomic sequencing companies. Investors welcomed sequencing newcomer Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) to the public stage with a strong initial public offering (IPO). According to The Wall Street Journal, the company managed “the first U.S. life-sciences [IPO] this year to price well and trade higher” (although […]

Twitter Roundup

With so many developments at the intersection of genomics and the law, there are often a variety of interesting stories that, for one reason or another, don’t find their way into a full-length posting on the Genomics Law Report. Here is a recap of what I was Tweeting recently @genomicslawyer: RT @biotechbythebay @EdwardWinstead: In today’s […]

Swine Soar Higher in Myriad Thanks to US Government’s Amicus Brief

This past March Judge Robert Sweet handed down an unexpected summary judgment ruling in the Myriad gene patent litigation (see: Pigs Fly: Federal Court Invalidates Myriad’s Patent Claims). Myriad quickly appealed Sweet’s district court decision to the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC). After several months of courtroom quiet, the briefs began rolling […]