Robinson Bradshaw

Month: January 2011

Personalized Medicine Regulation Needs More Than Band-Aids

[Editor’s Note: This post originally appeared as a guest column at Xconomy.] Last week, New York State assemblyman J. Gary Pretlow introduced the descriptively named “act to amend the insurance law, in relation to requiring coverage for genetic testing in accident and health insurance polices.” While not accompanied by a press release, or widely covered […]

Twitter Roundup

With so many developments at the intersection of genomics and the law, there are often a variety of interesting stories that, for one reason or another, don’t find their way into a full-length posting on the Genomics Law Report. Here is a recap of what I was Tweeting recently @genomicslawyer: Agree w/ Greely: Fetal genetic […]

Government Refuses to March-In Under Bayh-Dole—Again

The Bayh-Dole Act was in the news at the end of 2010. Three patients suffering from Fabry disease, a rare genetic condition that impairs the victim’s ability to metabolize fat and can lead to kidney failure and heart disease, petitioned the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to exercise the government’s “march-in” rights under Bayh-Dole (pdf) […]

Twitter Roundup

With so many developments at the intersection of genomics and the law, there are often a variety of interesting stories that, for one reason or another, don’t find their way into a full-length posting on the Genomics Law Report. Here is a recap of what I was Tweeting recently @genomicslawyer: RT @mikesgene: For Whom the […]

A Googol of Genomes?

Earlier this week we took a look back at 2010 and offered our projections for the coming year in personal genomics. Topic #1, just as it was last year: the $1,000 genome. In hindsight, it might have been ill-advised to offer predictions about the near-term future of genome sequencing during the same week in which […]

2011 Personal Genomics Preview: It’s Déjà Vu…

Last January we kicked off the new year by posing “Five Questions for Personal Genomics in 2010.” Here were the five questions we asked: 1. Will the $1,000 genome live up to the hype? 2. Will personal genomics stay DTC? 3. How will the ongoing gene patent debate affect the progress of personalized medicine? 4. […]

Twitter Roundup

With so many developments at the intersection of genomics and the law, there are often a variety of interesting stories that, for one reason or another, don’t find their way into a full-length posting on the Genomics Law Report. Here is a recap of what I was Tweeting recently @genomicslawyer: RT @NatureNews: Alzheimer’s blood test […]