What does the FDA Approval of the MiSeqDx Platform Mean for DTC?

FDA v DTCOn November 19, 2013—three days before the highly-publicized warning letter to 23andMe (See here and here)—the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced that it had given approval for the marketing of four Illumina MiSeqDX medical devices. They include two cystic fibrosis genetic assays as well as the Illumina MiSeqDX instrument platform and Illumina Universal Kit reagents. The FDA’s press release characterizes them as “devices that can be used for high throughput gene sequencing, often referred to as ‘next generation sequencing’” (NGS). These instruments, reagents, and test systems allow labs to sequence a patient’s DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid).

What does the FDA’s approval of the MiSeqDx platform for the clinical market mean for the DTC industry? For example, does this mean that 23andMe could just switch platforms from the Illumina HumanOmniExpress-24 format chip to MiSeqDx and be free from future FDA meddling? Could new companies enter the industry free from regulatory burdens by using Illumina’s MiSeqDx platform? Don’t bet on it.

It is likely that the FDA would take the position that its 510(k) premarket approval (a process John explained briefly on December 3) of the MiSeqDx instrument and MiSeqDx Universal Kit was not intended to be a blanket “go ahead” for DTC providers to offer a service like 23andMe’s Personal Genome Service®. Rather, it is more likely that the FDA would insist on review and pre-market approval of MiSeqDx as an next-generation sequencing in vitro diagnostic (or NGSIVD) if it were used for any purpose other than return of raw genomic data (i.e., if any interpretation were provided along with that raw data). It is also unclear to what extent these FDA approvals will allow future applicants to rely on the approved MiSeqDX products as “predicate devices” to clear some of the regulatory hurdles more easily. (Specifically, the future applicant would claim that its device was “substantially equivalent” to the already-approved device.)

The FDA’s own press release nowhere mentions a non-patient consumer. The press release emphasizes how next-generation sequencing technologies are “becoming more accessible for use by physicians,” underscoring the FDA’s continued insistence that clinicians be the gatekeepers for accessing information about one’s genome. The press release states front and center: “The new technology also gives physicians the ability to take a broader look at their patients’ genetic makeup and can help in diagnosing disease or identifying the cause of symptoms.”

The FDA’s approval of the MiSeqDx platform is thus intriguing, but the future regulation of DTC genomic testing remains uncertain. The 510(k) approval of the MiSeqDx platform may signal that raw data provided DTC might be acceptable to the FDA but that interpretation of that genomic data in any way related to health would still provoke FDA scrutiny and, possibly, hostility. Could a DTC provider use the MiSeqDx platform and successfully argue that its interpretation of raw data is a Laboratory Developed Test (LDT; a test manufactured and used within a single CLIA-certified lab) and, therefore, potentially outside the reach of the FDA? We can’t say for sure at this point. As for the implications of this for 23andMe, as I reported on December 6, current indications suggest that the company is still trying to gain FDA approval of its Personal Genome Service.