Robinson Bradshaw

Author: Dan Vorhaus

The Burden of Enforcing GINA: EEOC v. Nestle Illustrates One Challenge in Pursuing Genetic Discrimination Claims

The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA) is a federal law making it illegal for insurers and employers to acquire and to use genetic information in certain contexts. Specifically, Title II of GINA prohibits employers with more than 15 employees, employment agencies, labor organizations, and joint labor-management training and apprenticeship program committees from using […]

Patenting and Personal Genomics: 23andMe Receives its First Patent, and Plenty of Questions

Earlier this week 23andMe, the Silicon Valley-based personal genomics company, was awarded its first patent: US Patent Number 8,187,811, entitled “Polymorphisms associated with Parkinson’s disease”. 23andMe co-founder Anne Wojcicki announced the issuance of the patent via a post on the company’s blog late Monday evening, attempting to strike a tenuous balance between her company’s oft-championed philosophical […]

Myriad Finally Reaches the Supreme Court (But Only For a Moment)

Yesterday, the Supreme Court (as we predicted last week that it might) GVR’d the certiorari petitions (pdf) of both parties in the Myriad Genetics case. Big news, right? Not really. What this means is that the Court Granted cert in Myriad, but for the limited purpose of Vacating the Federal Circuit’s July 2011 decision and Remanding […]

On Genetic Rights and States: a Look at South Dakota and Around the U.S.

SD H.B. 1260, introduced in South Dakota on January 26, 2012, is an act that would govern the use of genetic information. By any standards – and especially by legislative standards – the two-page bill (pdf) is succinct and should not be considered a state variation of GINA, as the bill does not speak to […]

Alabama’s “Genetic Information Privacy Act” & the Ongoing Need for Personal Genomics Leadership

Jennifer K. Wagner, J.D., Ph.D., is a solo-practicing attorney in State College, PA and a research associate at the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for the Integration of Genetic Healthcare Technologies. Thanks to technological innovation and a corresponding decline in cost, an increasing number of individuals are finding themselves with the task – or at least […]

Big Changes Coming in EU Privacy Law

The European Union is about to make major changes in its privacy law that will have a significant impact on U.S. companies that do even modest amounts of business in Europe. On January 25, 2011, the European Commission (the EU’s executive branch) released a long-awaited Draft Regulation on the Protection of Individuals with Regard to […]

Surreptitious Genetic Testing: A New Bill in Texas and the Iowa Straw Poll

Although the United States will not conduct its next presidential election for another fifteen months, the race for the White House begins in earnest tomorrow in Iowa with the Ames Straw Poll. As the coverage of straw polls, campaign ads and political positioning shifts into high gear, it may not be a coincidence that the […]

Pigs Return to Earth: Federal Circuit Reinstates Most—But Not All—of Myriad’s Patents

The Federal Circuit’s long-awaited decision (pdf) in Association for Molecular Pathology v. USPTO (the Myriad gene patent litigation) was issued this past Friday.  As we were writing, with the economy having slowed to a barely perceptible crawl and a government default looming more likely by the hour, there were plenty of reasons to believe that […]

News Roundup: Patent Reform Passes House, Human Provenance Project Pulled by UK

With so many developments at the intersection of genomics and the law, there is often a variety of interesting stories that, for one reason or another, don’t find their way into a full-length posting on the Genomics Law Report. In this post we recap several recent key developments and, at bottom, round up all of […]

Prometheus Returns to the Supreme Court, Medical Method Patent Speculation Intensifies

While everyone has been busy speculating about whether the Supreme Court will ultimately take the Myriad case, the justices (at least four of them—see below) sprung a surprise this week by deciding to review the Federal Circuit’s decision in another biomedical patent case, Prometheus v. Mayo. The patents at issue in Prometheus involve a method […]