Robinson Bradshaw

Topic: ACLU

ACLU v. Myriad Genetics, Round 2: The Problem of Governance-by-Guidance

Just about everyone interested enough in genomics and the law to read this post will know that the American Civil Liberties Union waged a long and ultimately successful legal campaign to invalidate Myriad Genetics’ patent claims to isolated BRCA genes, mutations of which are linked to breast and ovarian cancer. Now the ACLU has launched […]

Applying Mayo to Myriad: Latest Decision Brings No New News (Plus: Why the Final Myriad Decision Might Not Matter for Personalized Medicine)

The latest chapter in the Myriad gene patent litigation was written yesterday, with the Federal Circuit issuing its much anticipated opinion (pdf) after rehearing the case following the Supreme Court’s unanimous decision earlier this year in Prometheus v. Mayo. Or perhaps we should say that the latest chapter was “rewritten” as, in a move that […]

ACLU and Myriad Both Seek Further Federal Circuit Review

As we suspected they might, the plaintiffs in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics have filed a petition (pdf) seeking a rehearing of the recent federal Circuit decision. More surprisingly, Myriad has also, though its petition (pdf) is very narrowly focused. The Plaintiffs’ Petition. Two things are interesting about the plaintiffs’ petition from a procedural […]

Pigs Return to Earth: Federal Circuit Reinstates Most—But Not All—of Myriad’s Patents

The Federal Circuit’s long-awaited decision (pdf) in Association for Molecular Pathology v. USPTO (the Myriad gene patent litigation) was issued this past Friday.  As we were writing, with the economy having slowed to a barely perceptible crawl and a government default looming more likely by the hour, there were plenty of reasons to believe that […]

Personalized Medicine Regulation Needs More Than Band-Aids

[Editor’s Note: This post originally appeared as a guest column at Xconomy.] Last week, New York State assemblyman J. Gary Pretlow introduced the descriptively named “act to amend the insurance law, in relation to requiring coverage for genetic testing in accident and health insurance polices.” While not accompanied by a press release, or widely covered […]

Digging Deeper into the EEOC’s Final GINA Regulations

As we wrote yesterday, last week the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) issued definitive rules and regulations (pdf) with respect to Title II of the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 (GINA). In our previous post we offered a brief overview of the new regulations, as well as some preliminary suggestions for employers just now coming […]

Swine Still Soaring: Federal Circuit Judge Expresses Sympathy for Myriad Analysis

Back in March, we headlined our discussion of the district court judgment in the Myriad case “Pigs Fly.” Guess what?—they’re still aloft. On August 4, in a highly technical patent case that, appropriately enough, involved “porcine virus DNA,” one Federal Circuit judge—dissenting Judge Timothy B. Dyk—suggested that he might agree with the basic principle of […]

The Unintended Consequences of Katie’s Law: More DNA Samples Collected, More DNA Samples Untested?

Last month, we discussed a bill nicknamed “Katie’s Law” that would give states financial incentives to collect DNA samples from individuals arrested for certain crimes. At the moment, less than half of the states currently collect DNA samples from these arrestees. If Katie’s Law were enacted, the remainder of the states would likely expand the […]

Myriad Gene Patent Litigation Goes Down Under

On Tuesday, June 9, 2010, several plaintiffs, including a breast cancer patient and a cancer advocacy group, sued in a Sydney, Australia federal court to invalidate Myriad Genetics’ patents on the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA-1 and 2. According to published reports and comments by Australian patent law experts, the suit substantially tracks the much-publicized […]

Keeping Up With CODIS and Katie’s Law

A few weeks back, we posted a discussion of the issues surrounding the current system of forensic DNA profiling, with an emphasis on the Combined DNA Index System (CODIS). In that post, we noted that the federal government had enacted a policy of taking DNA samples from individuals arrested for certain crimes and retaining the samples […]