Robinson Bradshaw

Topic: de-identification

Mapping the Personal Genomics Landscape

Last week saw the first annual Genomes, Environments, Traits (GET) Conference, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Timed to coincide with DNA Day 2010, the conference marked one decade since the publication of the draft consensus human genome sequence. The GET Conference was billed as “the last chance in history to collect everyone with a personal genome sequence […]

The Unexpected Impact of Genetics on the Business World

Recent advances in genetic science are remarkable. In 2003 the first full human genome was sequenced after 13 years of work at a cost of over $3 billion. Today, the cost to sequence any individual’s entire genome is approaching $1,000. Genetic tests for specific genes linked to cancer and other diseases exist today and many […]

Genomic Privacy and Re-Identification Redux

New research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences from Loukides et al. offers up a new method for preserving individual privacy while linking genomic and healthcare data. (“Anonymization of electronic medical records for validating genome-wide association studies.”) Daniel Cressey of Nature News and Katharine Gammon of Technology Review have […]

The Texas Newborn Bloodspot Saga has Reached a Sad – and Preventable – Conclusion

Contributed by Ann Waldo, Senior Counsel at Genetic Alliance. In late February, the state of Texas incinerated 5.3 million newborn bloodspots. The background – the Genomics Law Report has had several posts (here and here) about the ongoing situation involving 5.3 million newborn bloodspots in a state biorepository in Texas. Often referred to as “residual” […]