Robinson Bradshaw

Topic: forensic DNA

Judicial and Legislative Reactions in California to Maryland v. King, 133 S. Ct. 1958 (2013)

This year’s first news in the area of genetics and criminal law comes to us from California, where both the judicial and legislative branches are reacting to the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Maryland v. King. In Maryland v. King, the Supreme Court upheld DNA fingerprinting as a routine booking procedure for serious crimes as […]

All Eyes on Maryland v. King: Recapping the Supreme Court Oral Argument

Seating was in short supply to hear oral arguments before the Supreme Court in what J. Alito referred to as “the most important criminal procedural case that this court has heard in decades,” Maryland v. King. Eager spectators –including this contributor for the Genomics Law Report – lined up along the marble steps of the […]

ENCODE, CODIS, and the Urgent Need to Focus on what is Scientifically and Legally Relevant to the DNA Fingerprinting Debate

Sara Huston Katsanis, MS is an Associate in Research at the Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy at Duke University. On September 5, 2012, a coordinated release of 30 articles in Nature, Cell, Science, Genome Research, Genome Biology and other journals published the long-awaited findings of The Encylopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Consortium. The press coverage […]

Courts in Unsettled Territory turn to the Map Available: United States v. Mitchell

We recently covered the Ninth Circuit’s split decision in Haskell v. Harris,1 which found DNA Fingerprinting of arrestees pursuant to California’s Prop 69 to be constitutionally sound. We also reported the Minnesota Supreme Court findings in In re Welfare of M.L.M. and State v. Johnson, rejecting challenges of DNA Fingerprinting based on 4th Amendment and […]

On Genetic Rights and States: a Look at South Dakota and Around the U.S.

SD H.B. 1260, introduced in South Dakota on January 26, 2012, is an act that would govern the use of genetic information. By any standards – and especially by legislative standards – the two-page bill (pdf) is succinct and should not be considered a state variation of GINA, as the bill does not speak to […]

Pennsylvania Seeks Expansion of its Forensic DNA Database

Jennifer K. Wagner, J.D., Ph.D., is a solo-practicing attorney in State College, PA and a research associate at the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for the Integration of Genetic Healthcare Technologies. Last month, the Pennsylvania General Assembly voted in favor of a bill that would expand the Commonwealth’s criminal database. PA Senate Bill 775 authorizes law […]

Forensic DNA Fights Terrorism

The big news from the past 24 hours is the death of Osama Bin Laden, which was reported late Sunday evening by President Barack Obama. That’s front page news the world over. But Genomics Law Report readers might be interested to note that DNA appears to have played a significant role in confirming that it […]

More News on DNA in Forensics

We recently noted that DNA profiling has greater public approval in the UK than in America. The UK presently operates the largest DNA database in the world with over 5 million profiles. Nevertheless, that country has just taken a giant step in the opposite direction. New civil liberties legislation, dubbed “the freedom bill,” will require […]

Recent Developments in Forensic DNA

The use of DNA in forensics continues to expand. Last year, James Cass reviewed the current system of forensic DNA profiling in the U.S., including CODIS (the Combined DNA Index System, the FBI’s integrated DNA profiling program), the controversial practice of partial/familial searching, and calls from President Obama and others to collect DNA profiles for […]

2011 Personal Genomics Preview: It’s Déjà Vu…

Last January we kicked off the new year by posing “Five Questions for Personal Genomics in 2010.” Here were the five questions we asked: 1. Will the $1,000 genome live up to the hype? 2. Will personal genomics stay DTC? 3. How will the ongoing gene patent debate affect the progress of personalized medicine? 4. […]