Robinson Bradshaw

Topic: George Church

What We Learned From The Myriad Oral Argument

Yesterday brought the long-anticipated oral argument in the Myriad gene patent litigation. After much speculation, the final panel consisted of Judges Lourie, Bryson and Moore. Following the Myriad argument, Judge Lourie was replaced on the panel for the remainder of the day’s cases by Judge O’Malley, lending support to speculation that Judge O’Malley recused herself […]

Genomic Privacy and Re-Identification Redux

New research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences from Loukides et al. offers up a new method for preserving individual privacy while linking genomic and healthcare data. (“Anonymization of electronic medical records for validating genome-wide association studies.”) Daniel Cressey of Nature News and Katharine Gammon of Technology Review have […]

Why the State of Personal Genomics is Not as Dire as You Think

Another Tale of the Struggle of Personal Genomics, Full of Sound and Fury, Signifying…What? After a while, the personal genomics news cycle can begin to feel predictable. Recently, and not for the first time, there have been rumblings that personal genomics pioneer 23andMe is struggling. The most recent “news” appears to be a December SEC […]

Personal Genomics in the News: Desmond Tutu and the GET Conference

It’s been a busy twenty-four hours in the world of personal genomics. Yesterday, as announced in the journal Nature, the number of individuals who have had their genomes sequenced and made publicly available increased by two. Archbishop Desmond Tutu and !Gubi, a tribal elder from a Bushman (or Khoisan) community in Namibia, joined the ranks […]

Completing the Personal Genomics Toolkit

The big news buzzing through the world of genomics this afternoon is the publication of a paper in the journal Science announcing the production of three whole-genome sequences at an average materials cost of $4,400. The work was performed by the third-generation sequencing company Complete Genomics Incorporated, along with researchers from George Church’s lab at Harvard […]

Re-identification and its Discontents

Last fall, a paper from Homer et al. in PLoS Genetics made waves by demonstrating that it was possible, in principle, to identify an individual’s genomic data within a large dataset of pooled genomic data. Pooled or aggregated genomic data had previously been considered to provide individual research participants with a strong measure of privacy. The […]

The Scientific Foundation for Personal Genomics: Recommendations from the Joint NIH-CDC Workshop

Last December, some of the true heavyweights in the field of personal genomics convened for a two-day workshop cosponsored by the CDC and NIH to review the science and implementation of personal genomics. Participants included scientific luminaries (e.g., Francis Collins, George Church and Bob Green), personal genomics companies (e.g., 23andMe, Knome, Navigenics, deCODE Genetics and […]

New Fuel for the Genomic Privacy Debate

The growth of prominent genomics research and direct-to-consumer (DTC) commercial services that combine genomic data with phenotypic data, environmental data and personal health surveys continues to spur debate over the appropriate privacy safeguards and expectations for individuals who participate in such research or enroll in such services. From large-scale genomic research projects such as the […]

Recap from the Consumer Genetics Show: Illumina Gets Personal in Advance of the Coming Bioinformatics Bottleneck

The first annual Consumer Genetics Show took place last week (June 9-11) in Boston, MA. With much anticipation — and some uncertainty about what to expect from the inaugural event — research, commercial and thought innovators from across the country came together to discuss the present and the future of consumer genetics technologies and services and the […]