Robinson Bradshaw

Topic: Human Genome Project

The Next Social Media Revolution Will Occur In…Personalized Medicine?

Social media – including Facebook, Twitter and other social networking platforms – are widely credited with fundamentally altering the nature of political discourse and, in some instances, credited as catalysts of political revolution. But social media’s ability to affect change need not be limited to politics, as recent developments in the arena of personalized medicine […]

Is the Genetic Rights Movement Picking Up Steam?

The movement to confer greater legal protection to individuals’ genetic information has added another participant. Last month, we examined newly introduced legislation in Massachusetts which, if passed, would create a “Genetic Bill of Rights,” significantly expanding Massachusetts residents’ personal property and privacy rights in their genetic information. Since then, in what the Council for Responsible […]

Getting Our Act Together for the Second Decade of Human Genomics

[Editor’s Note: This post originally appeared at Daniel MacArthur’s blog Genetic Future, which is part of Wired Science Blogs.] We have recently summarized efforts by two state legislatures to design regulatory schemes addressing issues raised by the proliferation of genetic information about individuals. New York’s effort addresses questions of insurance coverage for genetic testing. Massachusetts’ […]

A Googol of Genomes?

Earlier this week we took a look back at 2010 and offered our projections for the coming year in personal genomics. Topic #1, just as it was last year: the $1,000 genome. In hindsight, it might have been ill-advised to offer predictions about the near-term future of genome sequencing during the same week in which […]

2011 Personal Genomics Preview: It’s Déjà Vu…

Last January we kicked off the new year by posing “Five Questions for Personal Genomics in 2010.” Here were the five questions we asked: 1. Will the $1,000 genome live up to the hype? 2. Will personal genomics stay DTC? 3. How will the ongoing gene patent debate affect the progress of personalized medicine? 4. […]

Personal Genomics Goes to Washington

Next week, the eyes of the personal genomics world will be focused on Washington, D.C., where the FDA and Congress will be meeting separately to consider the industry’s future. First, the FDA will convene a highly-anticipated public meeting (July 19th and 20th) to “discuss how the agency will oversee laboratory-developed tests (LDTs).” The FDA announced last month a proposal […]

The Unexpected Impact of Genetics on the Business World

Recent advances in genetic science are remarkable. In 2003 the first full human genome was sequenced after 13 years of work at a cost of over $3 billion. Today, the cost to sequence any individual’s entire genome is approaching $1,000. Genetic tests for specific genes linked to cancer and other diseases exist today and many […]

MLB Meets GINA

According to an article in today’s New York Times, Major League Baseball’s department of investigations is conducting genetic testing on certain Latin American prospects in an attempt to verify their reported ages. The Times reports that MLB has confirmed that it conducts genetic testing to confirm paternity/maternity “in very rare instances and only on a […]

Betting on the Next 20 Years of Genomic Science

Without a doubt, the Human Genome Project produced some of the most significant advancements in genomic science of the past two decades, from seismic improvements in genomic sequencing technologies to the first ever “map” of the human genome.  In 2000, as the Human Genome Project was marching toward completion, Ewan Birney of the European Bioinformatics […]

Knowing Thyself: Beyond the Human Genome Awaits the Human Microbiome

The fruits of the Human Genome Project (HGP), completed in 2003, have given scientists and researchers unparalleled insight into the structure and function of the human genome and ongoing research — such as the 1,000 Genomes Project and the Personal Genome Project — continue to refine our map of the human genome.  But the human body […]