Robinson Bradshaw

Topic: NIH

NIH Refuses to March In—Again—And National Academies Challenge Human Subjects Regulation

The last few days have seen two significant news items from Washington. First, the National Institutes of Health have refused—yet again—to exercise their “march-in” rights to grant third-party licenses to a patented drug developed with federal funding. The drug in question is enzalutamide, a prostate cancer treatment marketed under the brand name Xtandi by Japanese […]

Alabama’s “Genetic Information Privacy Act” & the Ongoing Need for Personal Genomics Leadership

Jennifer K. Wagner, J.D., Ph.D., is a solo-practicing attorney in State College, PA and a research associate at the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for the Integration of Genetic Healthcare Technologies. Thanks to technological innovation and a corresponding decline in cost, an increasing number of individuals are finding themselves with the task – or at least […]

Weekly Roundup: FDA Regulations, Science Funding and Newborn Screening

With so many developments at the intersection of genomics and the law, there is often a variety of interesting stories that, for one reason or another, don’t find their way into a full-length posting on the Genomics Law Report. In this post we recap several recent key developments and, at bottom, round up all of […]

Fabry Patients Ask for Rehearing of NIH March-in Petition

Back in December, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) refused to exercise the government’s “march-in” rights under the Bayh-Dole Act with respect to the patent-protected drug Fabrazyme® (agalsidase beta). A group of Fabry disease patients had petitioned NIH to grant licenses to other prospective producers of the enzyme replacement therapy because manufacturing problems at Genzyme, […]

Weekly Roundup: Science Funding, DTC and Medical Device Caucusing

With so many developments at the intersection of genomics and the law, there are often a variety of interesting stories that, for one reason or another, don’t find their way into a full-length posting on the Genomics Law Report. Here we recap several recent key developments and, at bottom, round up all of the recent […]

Frustrated by NIH Inaction, Fabry Patients Attempt End Run Around Bayh-Dole

Back on January 18, 2010, we reported on the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) refusal to exercise the government’s “march-in” rights under the Bayh-Dole Act with respect to the patent-protected drug Fabrazyme (agalsidase beta). The drug is an enzyme replacement produced from a recombinant mammalian cell line (i.e., a biologic) and is used to treat […]

Clearing a Path for DTC Oversight

In a few hours, the FDA will kick off a two-day public meeting to consider the future of clinical direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests. Few corners of the personal genomics landscape have generated as much attention from regulators, consumers and, especially, the media as DTC genetic testing. Thus, when the meeting was first announced last month, […]

Getting Our Act Together for the Second Decade of Human Genomics

[Editor’s Note: This post originally appeared at Daniel MacArthur’s blog Genetic Future, which is part of Wired Science Blogs.] We have recently summarized efforts by two state legislatures to design regulatory schemes addressing issues raised by the proliferation of genetic information about individuals. New York’s effort addresses questions of insurance coverage for genetic testing. Massachusetts’ […]

Personalized Medicine Regulation Needs More Than Band-Aids

[Editor’s Note: This post originally appeared as a guest column at Xconomy.] Last week, New York State assemblyman J. Gary Pretlow introduced the descriptively named “act to amend the insurance law, in relation to requiring coverage for genetic testing in accident and health insurance polices.” While not accompanied by a press release, or widely covered […]

Government Refuses to March-In Under Bayh-Dole—Again

The Bayh-Dole Act was in the news at the end of 2010. Three patients suffering from Fabry disease, a rare genetic condition that impairs the victim’s ability to metabolize fat and can lead to kidney failure and heart disease, petitioned the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to exercise the government’s “march-in” rights under Bayh-Dole (pdf) […]