Robinson Bradshaw

Topic: Personal Genome Project

The Next Social Media Revolution Will Occur In…Personalized Medicine?

Social media – including Facebook, Twitter and other social networking platforms – are widely credited with fundamentally altering the nature of political discourse and, in some instances, credited as catalysts of political revolution. But social media’s ability to affect change need not be limited to politics, as recent developments in the arena of personalized medicine […]

What We Learned From The Myriad Oral Argument

Yesterday brought the long-anticipated oral argument in the Myriad gene patent litigation. After much speculation, the final panel consisted of Judges Lourie, Bryson and Moore. Following the Myriad argument, Judge Lourie was replaced on the panel for the remainder of the day’s cases by Judge O’Malley, lending support to speculation that Judge O’Malley recused herself […]

Twitter Roundup: FDA DTC Edition (and a new format)

Beginning this week, we are unveiling a new format for the Genomics Law Report’s regular Twitter Roundup. In addition to cataloging Dan’s @genomicslawyer tweets, we will also be offering short summaries of several key developments pulled from those tweets which, for one reason or another, did not find their way into a full-length post. Think […]

Is the Genetic Rights Movement Picking Up Steam?

The movement to confer greater legal protection to individuals’ genetic information has added another participant. Last month, we examined newly introduced legislation in Massachusetts which, if passed, would create a “Genetic Bill of Rights,” significantly expanding Massachusetts residents’ personal property and privacy rights in their genetic information. Since then, in what the Council for Responsible […]

A Personal Genomics Update

As regular readers know, in addition to my work as an attorney, in my personal time I am also actively involved with several personal genomics projects. Two of those, Genomes Unzipped and the Personal Genome Project, had major announcements this week. On Monday, the twelve founders and co-collaborators at Genomes Unzipped (including me) published our […]

A Do-It-Yourself Genomic Challenge to Myriad, the FDA and the Future of Genetic Tests

Over the weekend, Steven L. Salzberg and Mihaela Pertea published a short but significant article in the journal Genome Biology. In “Do-it-yourself genetic testing,” Salzberg and Pertea describe the creation of “a computational screen that tests an individual’s genome for mutations in the BRCA genes, despite the fact that both are currently protected by patents.” […]

Mapping the Personal Genomics Landscape

Last week saw the first annual Genomes, Environments, Traits (GET) Conference, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Timed to coincide with DNA Day 2010, the conference marked one decade since the publication of the draft consensus human genome sequence. The GET Conference was billed as “the last chance in history to collect everyone with a personal genome sequence […]

Past, Present and Future of Genomes, Environments and Traits: 140 Characters at a Time

The first annual Genomes, Environments, Traits (GET) Conference took place yesterday. The GET Conference was an incredible success, with panels, breakout sessions and presentations from all manner of genomic pioneers and futurists, as well as a tremendous audience, both in person and online. In the next few days I’ll share a few thoughts about what […]

The Havasupai Indians and the Challenge of Informed Consent for Genomic Research

Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Amy Harmon, of The New York Times, reports that a long-running dispute between Arizona State University (ASU) and the Havasupai Indians over the allegedly improper research use of DNA from members of the tribe has been settled. The research began two decades ago, ostensibly to search for a genetic variant that might […]

Genomic Privacy and Re-Identification Redux

New research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences from Loukides et al. offers up a new method for preserving individual privacy while linking genomic and healthcare data. (“Anonymization of electronic medical records for validating genome-wide association studies.”) Daniel Cressey of Nature News and Katharine Gammon of Technology Review have […]