Robinson Bradshaw

Topic: USPTO

Analyzing The America Invents Act

The America Invents Act (pdf) (AIA), which was signed into law by President Obama on Friday, September 16, 2011, represents the first major legislative adjustment to the U.S. patent system in decades (see previous coverage). Many changes are included in the 37 sections of this bill, and they will not all take effect at the […]

Pigs Return to Earth: Federal Circuit Reinstates Most—But Not All—of Myriad’s Patents

The Federal Circuit’s long-awaited decision (pdf) in Association for Molecular Pathology v. USPTO (the Myriad gene patent litigation) was issued this past Friday.  As we were writing, with the economy having slowed to a barely perceptible crawl and a government default looming more likely by the hour, there were plenty of reasons to believe that […]

News Roundup: Patent Reform Passes House, Human Provenance Project Pulled by UK

With so many developments at the intersection of genomics and the law, there is often a variety of interesting stories that, for one reason or another, don’t find their way into a full-length posting on the Genomics Law Report. In this post we recap several recent key developments and, at bottom, round up all of […]

A Spectator’s Guide to the Myriad Oral Argument

On Monday at 10 a.m., the lawyers for both sides will argue the Myriad case (Association for Molecular Pathology v. USPTO) before a three-judge panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington. Here are a few things about oral argument in general, and this case in particular, that interested […]

Twitter Roundup: FDA DTC Edition (and a new format)

Beginning this week, we are unveiling a new format for the Genomics Law Report’s regular Twitter Roundup. In addition to cataloging Dan’s @genomicslawyer tweets, we will also be offering short summaries of several key developments pulled from those tweets which, for one reason or another, did not find their way into a full-length post. Think […]

Swine Soar Higher in Myriad Thanks to US Government’s Amicus Brief

This past March Judge Robert Sweet handed down an unexpected summary judgment ruling in the Myriad gene patent litigation (see: Pigs Fly: Federal Court Invalidates Myriad’s Patent Claims). Myriad quickly appealed Sweet’s district court decision to the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC). After several months of courtroom quiet, the briefs began rolling […]

Betting on Bilski: The Supreme Court and Biotechnology Patents

There is a two-part question that we are frequently asked these days: “When is Bilski going to be decided and what’s the decision going to be?” The first part of that question is easy to answer. Bilski will be decided soon. Need something more specific? Bilski will be decided sometime between today and the end […]

WARF Reexamination Takes Another Bite Out of Biotech Patents

Two months ago, the Myriad gene patent litigation generated a slew of national and international coverage. We said, “Pigs Fly: Federal Court Invalidates Myriad’s Patent Claims.”  “Is the DNA patent dead?” asked CNN. Wired (apparently answering CNN) declared the “End of Gene Patents Will Help Patients, Force Companies to Change.” Everyone, it seemed, either had an […]

The Unexpected Impact of Genetics on the Business World

Recent advances in genetic science are remarkable. In 2003 the first full human genome was sequenced after 13 years of work at a cost of over $3 billion. Today, the cost to sequence any individual’s entire genome is approaching $1,000. Genetic tests for specific genes linked to cancer and other diseases exist today and many […]

Welcome to Blawg Review #260

The Genomics Law Report is pleased to host the 260th Blawg Review. For regular GLR readers who are unfamiliar with the Blawg Review concept, it’s the longest-running weekly recap of legal blog posts in cyberspace. Each week, a different legal-related blog (also referred to as a blawg or, in the GLR’s case, an Internet journal) […]